Skip to main content

fatal: scan_dir_push: open directory defer: Permission denied

problem:-
Nov 7 18:24:18 linuxxf postfix-archive/postsuper[20555]: fatal: scan_dir_push: open directory defer: Permission denied
Nov 7 18:24:19 linuxxf postfix-archive/postfix-script: fatal: Postfix integrity check failed!
Nov 7 18:28:26 linuxxf postfix-archive/postsuper[21162]: fatal: scan_dir_push: open directory defer: Permission denied
Nov 7 18:29:57 linuxxf postfix-archive/postsuper[21334]: fatal: scan_dir_push: open directory defer: Permission denied

soloution:-
To correct queues that were created outside of Postfix:

postfix -c /etc/postfix-archive set-permissions

Comments

  1. Dude! It worked!!!!! Thank you...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Brilliant! Just what I was looking for. Under FreeBSD the command is of course:

    # postfix -c /usr/local/etc/postfix set-permissions

    Bookmarked for future reference.

    Now posted under the correct article :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

we changed in transport file and when we reload file then postfix not starting

when we change in transport file and reload the file then postfix not starting. maillog:- Dec 7 15:54:37 mailxf2RelayServer postfix-out/postfix-script: fatal: Postfix integrity check failed! Dec 7 16:05:10 mailxf2RelayServer postfix-out/postfix-script: fatal: the Postfix mail system is not running Dec 7 16:05:10 mailxf2RelayServer postfix-out/postsuper[21423]: fatal: scan_dir_push: open directory bounce/A/A: Not a directory Dec 7 16:05:11 mailxf2RelayServer postfix-out/postfix-script: fatal: Postfix integrity check failed! [brijesh@mailxf2RelayServer ~]$ sol:- rm -r /var/spool/postfix-out/bounce/A /etc/init.d/postfix-out start

If you want to check between two machine NIC speed the follow the below steps:-

Install nc and pv $ sudo yum install pv Once you have nc and pv installed, it’s really simple. On one machine, run the following command: $ nc -ulp 5000 > /dev/null On the second machine run the following command (you need the IP address of the first machine): $ pv < /dev/zero | nc -u 192.168.0.174 5000 And you should get some output with a little <=> sign moving across the screen that resembles this (static): 1.15GB 0:00:19 [ 218MB/s] [ <=> ] This will show you the number of MB/s the connection is averaging; if you watch if for a bit, you can get an idea of where things stand. Here are some of the results I got between my RedHat, Fedora and Ubuntu Machines: